everything i can't say

Ask me anything   23 year old mess.

asylum-art:

 Nicole Dextras freezes garments in solid blocks of ice

using ice as both her photographic and sculptural medium, environmental artist nicole dextras freezes garments of varying season, texture, and fabric in frosted volumes, highlighting the wardrobe’s skeletal qualities. the series that makes up ‘castaways’ has been captured on toronto island, a small community celebrated for its beach and amusement park open during the warm months, while the winter period leaves the town somewhat devoid of its usual summertime energy. with this in mind, dextras imagines the apparel representing the spirits of the theme park frozen in time, out of season, waiting for the great melt. the ephemeral nature of the urban sculptural installations invite the viewer to construct their own narrative as the artist explains, ‘like an isolated silent film still, they exist only for a moment and then the movie continues on.’ 

(via brandef)

— 1 day ago with 1073 notes
crustyball:

praxis89:

Orange in his Hand
I see two men sweat at the exit of the freeway.
One is brown and burnt from the sun rays the other is white with an American Flag stitched across his trucker hat.
They both wear dirty clothes. They both burn  to hold a little green.
One sells oranges, walking up and down the street.  One holds a sign that reads, “I’m hungry, help me eat.” I feel for both of them, but I only admire one.
The one who hands oranges in bags to tired faces, who chases cars for his change, who counts pennies as profit to keep his apartment.
The one whose wife wakes before sunrise to walk through Los Angeles streets yelling “tamales, tamales” with a 4 year old daughter  at her side.
The mother who crossed over 4 years earlier so her daughter wouldn’t have to sell tamales with a baby at her side.
The father tells his son never to beg, but to work hard for the bread. So the son sells Cheetos at his high school and gets called beaner for not owning  named brand clothes. A son who must bring dollars before good grades because rent is two weeks late. A son who will one day hold  a gun to the head of a liquor store clerk, only to remember  his father’s words.
Mijo, work hard for the bread.
Rent is two weeks late  so the family breaks tax laws to make jobs and they lifts roses to the sky hoping someone passing by is falling in love again, so the family takes elotes to the neighborhood projects hoping the ninos are hungry.
The news says this family is here to take my job,  my seat in school,  my country, but the only thing they’re taking  is the risk of being handcuffed, broken and deported in the name of family in the name of love in the name of trying  everything to stay above the current and that is why I can’t help
But to admire the man with an orange in his hand, a fireball of hunger in his palm.

This legitimately made me tear up knowing I have relatives in these situations.

crustyball:

praxis89:

Orange in his Hand

I see two men sweat
at the exit
of the freeway.

One is brown and burnt
from the sun rays
the other is white
with an American Flag
stitched across his trucker hat.

They both wear dirty clothes.
They both burn
to hold
a little green.

One sells oranges, walking up
and down the street.
One holds a sign that reads,
“I’m hungry, help me eat.”
I feel for both of them,
but I only admire one.

The one who hands
oranges in bags to tired faces,
who chases cars
for his change,
who counts pennies
as profit
to keep his apartment.

The one whose wife wakes
before sunrise to walk
through Los Angeles streets
yelling “tamales, tamales”
with a 4 year old daughter
at her side.

The mother who crossed over
4 years earlier so her daughter
wouldn’t have to sell tamales
with a baby at her side.

The father tells his son
never to beg,
but to work hard for the bread.
So the son sells Cheetos
at his high school
and gets called beaner
for not owning
named brand clothes.
A son who must bring dollars
before good grades
because rent is two weeks late.
A son who will one day hold
a gun to the head
of a liquor store clerk,
only to remember
his father’s words.

Mijo, work hard for the bread.

Rent is two weeks late
so the family
breaks tax laws to make jobs
and they lifts roses to the sky
hoping someone passing by
is falling in love again,
so the family
takes elotes
to the neighborhood projects
hoping the ninos are hungry.

The news says this family is here
to take my job,
my seat in school,
my country,
but the only thing they’re taking
is the risk
of being handcuffed,
broken and deported
in the name of family
in the name of love
in the name of trying
everything to stay above
the current
and that is why
I can’t help

But to admire the man
with an orange in his hand,
a fireball of hunger in his palm.

This legitimately made me tear up knowing I have relatives in these situations.

(via i-walk-a-path-unknown)

— 1 day ago with 1563 notes
#fuck man  #important 

People will stare. Make it worth their while → Basil Soda Haute Couture | F/W ‘12-‘13

(via sheaweberway)

— 1 day ago with 928 notes
#fashion 
thecutestofthecute:

Breeder Amy Green laughs as her 3-year-old Samoyed, Bogey, who sleeps with his tongue out during grooming.

thecutestofthecute:

Breeder Amy Green laughs as her 3-year-old Samoyed, Bogey, who sleeps with his tongue out during grooming.

(Source: Found on vetstreet.com, via seekercranny)

— 1 day ago with 12213 notes
todaysdocument:

Happy 115th Birthday, Ernest Hemingway!
Author Ernest Hemingway enjoys a drink with other war correspondents on the island of Mont St. Michel, off northern France, in the summer of 1944.  Born on July 21, 1899, the author would have likely celebrated his 45th birthday a few weeks before this scene.

Excerpted from: D-Day to Germany, 1944
From the series: Motion Picture Films Relating to the Invasion of Normandy (D-Day) and Commemorative Visits After the War, compiled 1944 - 1969. Collection LIEB: Jack Lieb Collection, 1944 - 1969

Taken by newsreel cameraman Jack Lieb, this color home movie was donated by the Lieb family to the National Archives in 1984. You’ll see D-Day from a perspective different than the official military film or commercial newsreel. With his personal footage, Lieb takes the viewer through the preparations in England, where he spent time with war correspondents Ernie Pyle, Jack Thompson, and Larry LaSueur, to the liberation of Paris and finally into Germany. Along the way, Lieb captured his experience on 16mm Kodachrome, filming everyday people in France and the occasional celebrity, such as Edward G. Robinson or Ernest Hemingway. (Hemingway shows up around 26:45.)


Via The Unwritten Record » A Newsreel Cameraman’s View of D-Day

todaysdocument:

Happy 115th Birthday, Ernest Hemingway!

Author Ernest Hemingway enjoys a drink with other war correspondents on the island of Mont St. Michel, off northern France, in the summer of 1944.  Born on July 21, 1899, the author would have likely celebrated his 45th birthday a few weeks before this scene.

Excerpted from: D-Day to Germany, 1944

From the series: Motion Picture Films Relating to the Invasion of Normandy (D-Day) and Commemorative Visits After the War, compiled 1944 - 1969Collection LIEB: Jack Lieb Collection, 1944 - 1969

Taken by newsreel cameraman Jack Lieb, this color home movie was donated by the Lieb family to the National Archives in 1984. You’ll see D-Day from a perspective different than the official military film or commercial newsreel. With his personal footage, Lieb takes the viewer through the preparations in England, where he spent time with war correspondents Ernie PyleJack Thompson, and Larry LaSueur, to the liberation of Paris and finally into Germany. Along the way, Lieb captured his experience on 16mm Kodachrome, filming everyday people in France and the occasional celebrity, such as Edward G. Robinson or Ernest Hemingway. (Hemingway shows up around 26:45.)

Via The Unwritten Record » A Newsreel Cameraman’s View of D-Day

— 2 days ago with 590 notes

thepeoplesrecord:

Florida city police department embedded with KKK members
July 21, 2014

Ann Hunnewell and her central Florida police officer husband knelt in the living room of a fellow officer’s home, with pillow cases as makeshift hoods over their heads. A few words were spoken and they, along with a half-dozen others, were initiated into the local chapter of the Ku Klux Klan, she says.

Last week, that initiation ceremony, which took place five years ago, stunned residents of the small town of Fruitland Park, who found out an investigative report linked two city officers with the secret hate society that once was violently active in the area. Ann Hunnewell’s ex-husband, George Hunnewell, was fired, and deputy chief David Borst resigned from the 13-member Fruitland Park Police Department. Borst has denied being a member.

James Elkins, a third officer who Ann Hunnewell says recruited her and her husband, resigned in 2010 after his Klan ties became public.

Read More

(via thomassobien)

— 2 days ago with 6671 notes

favorite ladies: lucy liu

"Everything I buy is vintage and smells funny. Maybe that’s why I don’t have a boyfriend." 

(Source: glossywhit, via motheatenmusicalbrocade)

— 2 days ago with 286 notes
#flawless 

vicemag:

Radical Young Israelis and the Price Tag Attacks

For a few years, a young radical group of Israeli settlers in the West Bank have committed random acts of violence and vandalization against Palestinians and their property to make them pay the price for affronting their way of life. They call themselves “Pricetaggers,” and they’ve largely avoided prosecution by Israeli authorities.

VICE News gets rare access to the young members of the Price Tag movement—at the homecoming of Moriah Goldberg, 20, who just finished a three-month sentence for throwing stones at Palestinians. She and her family remain proud of the act, even as the current conflict in Gaza was sparked after an all-too-familiar round of retributive violence.

This is fucking disgusting

(via thebrown1)

— 2 days ago with 241 notes

futurejournalismproject:

Summer Reading from The New Yorker

The New Yorker is opening up its Web site for the next few months, letting visitors read everything currently being published — along with archives back to 2007 — for free.

The move comes alongside a site redesign.

Via The New Yorker:

Beginning this week, absolutely everything new that we publish—the work in the print magazine and the work published online only—will be unlocked. All of it, for everyone. Call it a summer-long free-for-all. Non-subscribers will get a chance to explore The New Yorker fully and freely, just as subscribers always have. Then, in the fall, we move to a second phase, implementing an easier-to-use, logical, metered paywall.

Images: Twitter posts from The New Yorker… and an ellipsis for good measure.

— 2 days ago with 194 notes

freedomforwhales:

When you have them in a concrete tank, these are very acoustic animals which means that they rely very heavily on their hearing. We rely so heavily on our vision and on our sight, we can’t really understand that. They have perfectly good vision but they’re completely sonic creatures, their echo location, their passive listening is just far superior to ours. And so to put them into a concrete environment where it is very monotone and there’s simply no variety, no texture, no substance, no depth to the environment why use their echo location, they know where the four walls are, it’s an extremely limited environment.

There’s nothing in the tank, there’s no fish, there’s no algae, there’s no anything and so, it’s not that they can’t use their echo location in a concrete tank, it’s—why use it? They know exactly the limits of their environment so there’s no point to it and I think it’s a terrible thing to take away from them.- Dr. Naomi Rose

(via teamorkid)

— 2 days ago with 159 notes
"HAKUNA MA’VODKA"
it means no memories, for the rest of the night (via regenapplaus)

(Source: xxxl0veleenxxx, via sorelyinfatuated)

— 2 days ago with 29339 notes